How To Crack Bitcoin Private Key How To Get Bitcoin Deep Web

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

[Daily Discussion] Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Welcome to the /BitcoinMarkets daily discussion thread!
Thread topics include, but are not limited to:
Thread Guidelines
Other ways to interact
submitted by AutoModerator to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Summary: pitfalls of paper wallets

Pitfalls and solutions of paper wallets

Creating paper wallets:

Problematic action: Create a paper wallet on a paper wallet service website without disconnecting from the internet. Reason: It's extremely insecure for many reasons, some being 1) the website is hacked with generated private keys sent to the hacker; 2) there may be malware in the browser or in the operating system that sends the private keys to the hacker. Solution: The bottom line is to disconnect the internet before creating the paper wallet. It's not secure enough because 1) the malware can save the private keys and wait for internet connection to send them out; 2) the malware can interfere with the generation process itself and give you a private key that is already known to the hacker, which is called backdooring the random number generator; 3) the private keys may exist on the hard disk therefore may be extracted by malware or after the computer is disposed. Better solution: Download the paper wallet app from an online computer. Copy it to an offline computer via a flash drive. Run it from there. Best solution: Use a live operating system, such as a Linux live CD, to run the paper wallet app. This is not ultimately bullet-proof, especially for high-value targets, because there exist malware that can hide in the BIOS and firmware of your computer and can infect your live operating system. It should be secure enough for average Joes.
Problematic action: Create a paper wallet without serious verifications. Reason: There may be incompatible issues with operating systems and browsers. Solution: Run tests on various operating systems and various browsers before putting BTC in. Make sure the generated private keys are identical. This applies to regular paper wallets and BIP38 paper wallets. Make sure the decrypted BIP38 keys are correct.
Problematic action: Create a brain wallet created by bitaddress.org or other brain wallets without key stretching. Reason: It has been proven insecure. Solution: Use WarpWallet or other brain wallets with key stretching, e.g., scrypt, bcrypt, sha512crypt, pbkdf2, and so on.

Printing paper wallets:

Problematic action: Use a wireless printer. Reason: It's insecure because wireless networks are insecure. Solution: Use a wired printer.
Problematic action: Use an advanced printer, which has internal storage, such as a hard drive. Reason: It is insecure because the private key of the paper wallet printed may be stored on the internal storage, therefore may be recovered if the printer is sold or scrapped. Solution: Use a dumb printer. Or keep the printer locked up and never sell or scrap it. Or smash the printer, including and especially the internal storage.
Problematic action: Leave the printer open for other people to access after printing without turning it off. Reason: It's insecure because the private key printed may still be in the memory of the printer. Solution: Turn the printer off after printing.
Problematic action: Leave the computer untreated after printing. Reason: It's insecure because the printer driver and/or operating system may be keeping copies of the documents you print in some sort of "spool" or print queue. Solution: Use a live operating system, such as a Linux live CD, to print.
Problematic action: Use a shared printer (at work or school, for example). Reason: It's insecure because 1) the printer may have a glitch and someone else may get your printouts; 2) the printing jobs may be centrally logged. Solution: Don't. Use your own printer.
Problematic action: Use a printer to print the private key or the QR code of the private key. Reason: See above. Solution 1: Don't use a printer for private key stuff. Hand-write the private key. Hand-draw the QR code if you and the helping checker are patient enough. Or ignore the QR code since hand-drawing the QR code of the private key may be too time-consuming. Double check. Then check it again, preferably on a different day. Get someone you trust to check it. Then get him/her to check it again, preferably on a different day. (Testing the private key in a wallet app can make it sure. But it comes with risks.) Solution 2: Don't use a printer for private key stuff. Use brain wallet. Write down the passphrase and the relevant information, e.g., the name of the tool used, e.g., WarpWallet, and the instructions. Store it the same way as a paper wallet. Save and store some copies of the tool, in case the future versions become incompatible. (There are pitfalls for creating man-made passphrases. It is beyond the scope of this post. In a nutshell, don't create the passphrase (solely) with your brain, and don't keep the passphrase (solely) with your brain.)

Spending from paper wallets:

Problematic action: Import a paper wallet private key into a wallet app, then spend directly from the paper wallet address.
Mistake: Expect the paper wallet automatically receives/holds changes, similar to a real-life wallet, which may not be the case. Reason: Early wallet apps didn't handle the changes correctly. The changes became the transaction fees of the miners. There is a misunderstanding of how Bitcoin works. There is no account balance of any kind in Bitcoin. There is only Unspent Transaction Outputs (UTXOs). The receiving addresses of changes, which will become the new UTXOs, must be specified when BTC is spent. Otherwise, the changes will automatically become the transaction fees. This depends on the implementation of the wallet app, which should not be trusted.
Mistake: Think nothing is wrong if changes are handled correctly. Reason: It's called address reuse, which is not recommended in Bitcoin because 1) it reduces anonymity of both the sender and all the consecutive receivers; 2) it reduces the security by exposing the public key, which is vulnerable to quantum computing. Addresses are hashes of public keys, which are safe from quantum computing.
Mistake: Destroy the paper wallet after it's imported into an HD wallet, thinking that it has become a part of the HD wallet and it's safe to destroy because the master seed of the HD has been backed up. Reason: It is not a part of the HD wallet. If the paper wallet (the paper) is destroyed and the app is uninstalled, the BTC is gone even if the HD wallet is recovered from its master seed.
The right way: Spend (transact) all BTC in a paper wallet to an address of your wallet app. It is called "sweeping", which is completely different from importing the private key. Spend BTC from there. After all the spending is finished, create a new paper wallet and transact all the remaining BTC to it. Store the new paper wallet. Keep the old one for future reference, or destroy it if you don't want the trace.

Destroying paper wallets:

Problematic action: Destroy a paper wallet after it is used. Reason: You may need to prove you had control of that address some day, e.g., for taxation purpose. In the case of a chain split, you may have a balance on the other chain. Solution: Don't ever destroy a paper wallet. Keep it on file. Mark it with the relevant information, e.g., "Used in April 2017". Unless you don't want to be tied to the address.

Pitfalls not specific to but more likely happen to paper wallets:

Problematic action: Google a famous wallet app, click the first link or the sponsored link, download/install it, and use it, without serious research. Reason: It's insecure because the wallet app may be a scam. Solution: Do thorough research prior to deciding which wallet app to use. Find the official site prior to downloading/installing it.
Additions and corrections are welcome.
Edit: multiple editing for additions, corrections, and clarifications.
Disclaimer: Although I set off to make this article in order to use paper wallet safely, I ended up not using it. Some of the solutions are collected from the internet. Some are my untested ideas. Use the article at your risk.
submitted by exab to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I've traded all my dogecoins for bitcoins!

Hello bitcoin!
I only have one mining rig and it took a while to mine that 120k dogecoins. Today i traded all my dogecoins for bitcoin and now i've got 0.065 BTC in a cold wallet.
I think i have the worst timing ever but somehow it feels good to hold bitcoin :)
Any advice how i can get more BTC with my 1.6 MHs rig? Are BIP38 encrypted paper wallets safe enough?
Edit: I think i have 3 options now
  1. sell the rig and buy bitcoins
  2. sell the rig and buy an asic miner (if i there are some cheap ones)
  3. keep mining an altcoin and run a full bitcoin node on it
btw: is it possible to run a bitcoin node in a virtual machine?
Edit2: i decided to not sell my mining rig. I want to keep tinkering with it because of the educational value and to keep supporting bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. I'm setting up a full node inside a VM right now. Is there any incentive to host a p2pool?
submitted by shibe05 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Secure paper wallet tutorial

This is my handout for paranoid people who want a way to store bitcoin safely. It requires a little work, but this is the method I use because it should be resistant to risks associated with:
  1. Bad random number generators
  2. Malicious or flawed software
  3. Hacked computers
If you want a method that is less secure but easier, skip to the bottom of this post.
The Secure Method
  1. Download bitaddress.org. (Try going to the website and pressing "ctrl+s")
  2. Put the bitaddress.org file on a computer with an operating system that has not interacted with the internet much or at all. The computer should not be hooked up to the internet when you do this. You could put the bitaddress file on a USB stick, and then turn off your computer, unplug the internet, and boot it up using a boot-from-CD copy of linux (Ubuntu or Mint for example). This prevents any mal-ware you may have accumulated from running and capturing your keystrokes. I use an old android smart phone that I have done a factory reset on. It has no sim-card and does not have the password to my home wifi. Also the phone wifi is turned off. If you are using a fresh operating system, and do not have a connection to the internet, then your private key will probably not escape the computer.
  3. Roll a die 62 times and write down the sequence of numbers. This gives you 2160 possible outcomes, which is the maximum that Bitcoin supports.
  4. Run bitaddress.org from your offline computer. Input the sequence of numbers from the die rolls into the "Brain Wallet" tab. By providing your own source of randomness, you do not have to worry that the random number generator used by your computer is too weak. I'm looking at you, NSA ಠ_ಠ
  5. Brain Wallet tab creates a private key and address.
  6. Write down the address and private key by hand or print them on a dumb printer. (Dumb printer means not the one at your office with the hard drive. Maybe not the 4 in 1 printer that scans and faxes and makes waffles.) If you hand copy them you may want to hand copy more than one format. (WIF and HEX). If you are crazy and are storing your life savings in Bitcoin, and you hand copy the private key, do a double-check by typing the private key back into the tool on the "Wallet Details" tab and confirm that it recreates the same public address.
  7. Load your paper wallet by sending your bitcoin to the public address. You can do this as many times as you like.
  8. You can view the current balance of your paper wallet by typing the public address into the search box at blockchain.info
  9. If you are using an old cell phone or tablet do a factory reset when you are finished so that the memory of the private keys is destroyed. If you are using a computer with a boot-from-CD copy of linux, I think you can just power down the computer and the private keys will be gone. (Maybe someone can confirm for me that the private keys would not be able to be cached by bitaddress?)
  10. To spend your paper wallet, you will need to either create an offline transaction, or import the private key into a hot wallet. Creating an offline transaction is dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Importing to a client side wallet like Bitcoin-Qt, Electrum, MultiBit or Armory is a good idea. You can also import to an online wallet such as Blockchain.info or Coinbase.
Trusting bitaddress.org
The only thing you need bitaddress.org to do is to honestly convert the brainwallet passphrase into the corresponding private key and address. You can verify that it is doing this honestly by running several test passphrases through the copy of bitaddress that you plan on using, and several other brainwallet generators. For example, you could use the online version of bitaddress, and brainwallet and safepaperwallet and bitcoinpaperwallet. If you are fancy with the linux command line, you can also try "echo -n my_die_rolls | sha256sum". The linux operating system should reply with the same private key that bitaddress makes. This protects you from a malicious paper wallet generator.
Trusting your copy of bitaddress.org
Bitaddress publishes the sha1 hash of the bitaddress.org website at this location:
https://www.bitaddress.org/pgpsignedmsg.txt
The message is signed by the creator, pointbiz. I found his PGP fingerprint here:
https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org/issues/18
"527B 5C82 B1F6 B2DB 72A0 ECBF 8749 7B91 6397 4F5A"
With this fingerprint, you can authenticate the signed message, which gives you the hash of the current bitaddress.org file. Then you can hash your copy of the file and authenticate the file.
I do not have a way to authenticate the fingerprint itself, sorry. According to the website I linked to, git has cryptographic traceability that would enable a person to do some research and authenticate the fingerprint. If you want to go that far, knock yourself out. I think that the techniques described in this document do not really rely on bitaddress being un-corrupt. Anyway, how do we know pointbiz is a good guy? ;-)
There are a lot of skilled eyes watching bitaddress.org and the signed sha1 hash. To gain the most benefit from all of those eyes, it's probably worthwhile to check your copy by hashing it and comparing to the published hash.
"But we aren't supposed to use brainwallets"
You are not supposed to use brainwallets that have predictable passphrases. People think they are pretty clever about how they pick their passphrases, but a lot of bitcoins have been stolen because people tend to come up with similar ideas. If you let dice generate the passphrase, then it is totally random, and you just need to make sure to roll enough times.
How to avoid spending your life rolling dice
When I first started doing this, I rolled a die 62 times for each private key. This is not necessary. You can simply roll the die 62 times and keep the sequence of 62 numbers as a "seed". The first paper address you create would use "my die rolls-1" as the passphrase, the second would be "my die rolls-2" and so on. This is safe because SHA256 prevents any computable relationship between the resulting private key family.
Of course this has a certain bad security scenario -- if anyone obtains the seed they can reconstruct all of your paper wallets. So this is not for everyone! On the other hand, it also means that if you happen to lose one of your paper wallets, you could reconstruct it so long as you still had the seed.
One way to reduce this risk is to add an easy to remember password like this: "my die rolls-password-1".
If you prefer, you can use a technique called diceware to convert your die rolls to words that still contain the same quantity of entropy, but which could be easier to work with. I don't use diceware because it's another piece of software that I have to trust, and I'm just copy/pasting my high entropy seed, so I don't care about how ugly it is.
Why not input the dice as a Base 6 private key on the Wallet Details tab?
Two reasons. First of all, this option requires that you roll the die 99 times, but you do not get meaningful additional protection by rolling more than 62 times. Why roll more times if you don't have to? Second, I use the "high entropy seed" method to generate multiple private keys from the same die rolls. Using the Base 6 option would require rolling 99 times for every private key.
I'm a big nerd with exotic dice. How many times to roll?
Put this formula in Excel to get the number of times to roll: "=160*LOG(2,f)" where f = number of faces on the die. For example, you would roll a d16 40 times. By the way, somewhat unbelievably casino dice are more fair than ordinary dice
The "Change address" problem:
You should understand change addresses because some people have accidentally lost money by not understanding it.
Imagine your paper wallet is a 10 dollar bill. You use it to buy a candy bar. To do this you give the cashier the entire 10 dollar bill. They keep 1 dollar and give you 9 dollars back as change.
With Bitcoin, you have to explicitly say that you want 9 dollars back, and you have to provide an address where it should go to. If you just hand over the 10 dollar bill, and don't say you want 9 dollars back, then the miner who processes the transaction gives 1 dollar to the store and keeps the remainder themselves.
Wallet software like Bitcoin-Qt handles this automatically for you. They automatically make "change addresses" and they automatically construct transactions that make the change go to the change address.
There are three ways I know of that the change problem can bite you:
  1. You generate a raw transaction by hand, and screw up. If you are generating a transaction "by hand" with a raw transaction editor, you need to be extra careful that your outputs add up to the same number as your inputs. Otherwise, the very lucky miner who puts your transaction in a block will keep the difference.
  2. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the paper wallet. The change is not in the paper wallet. It is in a change address that the wallet software generated. That means that if you lose your wallet.dat file you will lose all the change. The paper wallet is empty.
  3. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the change address that the wallet software generated. If the transaction did not need to consume all of the "outputs" used to fund the paper wallet, then there could be some unspent outputs still located at the address of the paper wallet. If you destroyed the paper wallet, and destroyed the copy of the private key imported to the wallet software, then you could not access this money. (E.g. if you restored the software wallet from its seed, thinking all of the money was moved to the wallet-generated change addresses.)
For more on this, see here
The hot paper wallet problem
Your bitcoin in your paper wallet are secure, so long as the piece of paper is secure, until you go to spend it. When you spend it, you put the private key onto a computer that is connected to the internet. At this point you must regard your paper wallet address as hot because the computer you used may have been compromised. It now provides much less protection against theft of your coins. If you need the level of protection that a cold paper wallet provides, you need to create a new one and send your coins to it.
Destroying your paper wallet address
Do not destroy the only copy of a private key without verifying that there is no money at that address. Your client may have sent change to your paper wallet address without you realizing it. Your client may have not consumed all of the unspent outputs available at the paper wallet address. You can go to blockchain.info and type the public address into the search window to see the current balance. I don't bother destroying my used/empty paper wallet addresses. I just file them away.
Encrypting your private key
BIP 0038 describes a standardized way to encrypt your paper wallet private key. A normal paper wallet is vulnerable because if anyone sees the private key they can take the coins. The BIP38 protocol is even resistant to brute force attacks because it uses a memory intensive encryption algorithm called scrypt. If you want to encrypt your wallets using BIP38, I recommend that you use bitcoinpaperwallet because they will let you type in your own private key and will encrypt it for you. As with bitaddress, for high security you should only use a local copy of this website on a computer that will never get connected to the internet.
Splitting your private key
Another option for protecting the private key is to convert it into multiple fragments that must be brought together. This method allows you to store pieces of your key with separate people in separate locations. It can be set up so that you can reconstitute the private key when you have any 2 out of the 3 fragments. This technique is called Shamir's Secret Sharing. I have not tried this technique, but you may find it valuable. You could try using this website http://passguardian.com/ which will help you split up a key. As before, you should do this on an offline computer. Keep in mind if you use this service that you are trusting it to work properly. It would be good to find other independently created tools that could be used to validate the operation of passguardian. Personally, I would be nervous destroying the only copy of a private key and relying entirely on the fragments generated by the website.
Looks like Bitaddress has an implementation of Shamir's Secret Sharing now under the "Split Wallet" tab. However it would appear that you cannot provide your own key for this, so you would have to trust bitaddress.
Durable Media
Pay attention to the media you use to record your paper wallet. Some kinds of ink fade, some kinds of paper disintegrate. Moisture and heat are your enemies.
In addition to keeping copies of my paper wallet addresses I did the following:
  1. Order a set of numeric metal stamps. ($10)
  2. Buy a square galvanized steel outlet cover from the hardware store ($1)
  3. Buy a sledgehammer from the hardware store
  4. Write the die rolls on the steel plate using a sharpie
  5. Use the hammer to stamp the metal. Do all the 1's, then all the 2's etc. Please use eye protection, as metal stamp may emit sparks or fly unexpectedly across the garage. :-)
  6. Use nail polish remover to erase the sharpie
Electrum
If you trust electrum you might try running it on an offline computer, and having it generate a series of private keys from a seed. I don't have experience with this software, but it sounds like there are some slick possibilities there that could save you time if you are working with a lot of addresses.
Message to the downvoters
I would appreciate it if you would comment, so that I can learn from your opinion. Thanks!
The Easy Method
This method is probably suitable for small quantities of bitcoin. I would not trust it for life-altering sums of money.
  1. Download the bitaddress.org website to your hard drive.
  2. Close your browser
  3. Disconnect from the internet
  4. Open the bitaddress.org website from your hard drive.
  5. Print a paper wallet on your printer
  6. Close your browser
submitted by moral_agent to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

Buy a Keyois Capsule, less than 50 available

*This thread is no longer updated, please see: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1659001.0 for current information *
The Keyois Capsule is a tamper evident yet stylish way to keep a secret key. Only fifty (50) of these first edition capsules will be made. If you guys like them another fifty might get made.
Benefits over a conventional paper cold storage wallet include:
What's wrong with my current cold storage?
At current rate you can order one of these for 0.1947 btc You can get one delivered for $111USD when sales officially open in mid-October; or $100 US if you order before I have get someone with a real camera to take some pictures. I am sorry it costs so much but it wasn't cheap to make. PM me and we will work out the details!
I am not transmitting you any money, I am engraving your key for you and putting it in this cool thing. You have to supply me with you bitcoin address and BIP38 encrypted key, you also have to promise you understand what you are doing and that you made a good pass phrase. These are not for beginners, if you don't understand how and why to make a strong BIP38 encrypted pass phrase then these are not for you. If you desperately want me to make you an unencrypted capsule I suppose I can do it but I will berate you for the poor decision to trust me (I don't trust you, why should you trust me).
There are 4 total powder coated black end pieces, there is also the possibility to powder coat more pieces however there are some logistical difficulties in that so I would need at least ten people who want the same color or someone willing to pay a lot more for colored caps.
For added security, I recommend you add a dab of glitter nail polish over the drilled out screw heads and take a high resolution photograph; you can use that for a comparison in the future if you ever fear an elaborate scheme has taken place to drill out your capsule, break apart your rings, and replace it all without your knowledge.
See how it was made, sort of
Please re-read BIP38 and do some research on password strength
There are some variations/customizations that you can chose from which include: Most notably, the center piece. Lab-created corundum, this is the mineral rubies and sapphires are made out of. 21 red ruby stones remain
21 blue sapphire stones remain
Assorted Sunstones 1 2 3 4
Assorted Opals 1 2 still 2 [3](
Half opal and sunstone
A mix of tourmaline gems
Some crystal rods 2 skinny quartz rods 1 2 1 fatter quartz rod 1 1 extra skinny selenite rod 1
Glowing vials are not available for sale online; they come in a few colors including: white green - gone green - gone green light blue - gone blue pink orange yellow red - gone purple
These items themselves are not numbered, in fact I purposely made them nice and smooth without any words or websites printed on them.
To arrange creation of your own Keyois capsule please comment here or send me a personal message before you send funds. Please be prepared to sign a message with your key.
There can be no refunds - pay to [this address](13kqk3uk2b577KBSjZuwKQT3MGD9mEaVJC) only - $111 USD worth of BTC

13kqk3uk2b577KBSjZuwKQT3MGD9mEaVJC

There are 50 capsules that will be made for this first edition. To get the ball rolling I have made seven capsules available that are already ready-to-go that are available for sale without providing me with a encrypted key and address; I'll send you everything already generated and secured.
  1. Not for sale - Green vial
  2. Pre-ordered - Green vial / red O-ring
  3. Already ready - Ruby
  4. Already ready - Sapphire
  5. Already ready - Ruby
  6. Already ready - Sapphire
  7. Not for sale - Red vial
  8. Already ready - Ruby
  9. Already ready - Sapphire
  10. Already ready - Ruby
  11. Already ready - Sapphire / brown O-ring - Not for sale
  12. Reserved for testing purposes - TBD
  13. Reserved for testing purposes - TBD
They aren't as prefect and blemish proof as I wanted so I am sorry if there are tiny imperfections on the item, however they should still be a pretty and useful btc piggy bank.
Also I have been playing with (and kind of scratching) 13 or the available 50. Two of those are the black powder coated capsules (with some imperfections). These scratched capsules (the ones used in the pictures) I will sell for a slight (10%) discount.
submitted by ProfBitcoin to Keyois [link] [comments]

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